Friday, May 11, 2007

Some Twenty-somethings still wear Slippers

There was a photo in the Times today which showed a twenty-something couple who were both wearing slippers. You sometimes hear people saying that nobody wears slippers anymore. Given that most fashionable clothes shops have slippers on their shelves, that does not appear to be correct.

5 comments:

richyrich said...

Yes I saw that one. It was in an article about younger people trying to get onto the housing ladder in the UK. Maybe it is an indication that wearing shoes at home is becoming a less favoured option among the younger generation, something which ought to provide some home for the future.

Also the increase in house prices and the increasing burden that mortgage payments place upon people may make them value their houses more and take more care of them, including their flooring. Also, if they have bigger mortgage payments, it may well mean that they won't be able to replace their carpets and flooring as frequently and will be looking more at ways of extending their duration, one of which will be shoe removal!

Dyspraxic Fundamentalist said...

"Maybe it is an indication that wearing shoes at home is becoming a less favoured option among the younger generation, something which ought to provide some home for the future."

You will have noticed that the girl's father had his shoes on.

Good point about mortgages.

God Bless

Matthew

richyrich said...

You will have noticed that the girl's father had his shoes on.

Which suggests again that it may well be a generational thing, apoint that is also borne out by what you said about the fellowship meeting in your previous post.

Dyspraxic Fundamentalist said...

Yes, I think people of a certain age grew up being taught they need to have shoes on all the time.

The next generation were less strict about that and so they made their children take their shoes off to keep their homes cleaner, but would never have required it of adults guests.

The children of that generation who had to remove their shoes when they were younger are more relaxed about taking their shoes off and see it as being a politeness thing and do not see it as excessively informal. When that generation (my gneration) worry about their property and the cleanliness of their homes they are likely to require shoes-off (or at least others in their generation are likely to feel they should remove their shoes).

Of course, that is just my speculation and not based on any sociological research.

God Bless

Matthew

richyrich said...

Your theory seems to make sense to me.