Thursday, October 04, 2007

Telford and Wrekin NHS PCT: Guidelines on the Removal of Footwear When Visiting Clients

Telford and Wrekin NHS PCT: Guidelines on the Removal of Footwear When Visiting Clients

An NHS document on the subject of removing shoes in homes.

It says of the practice:

1.3 Clients may ask you to take off your shoes when visiting the ir homes for a number
of different reasons, including:
· When they are concerned that dirt from your footwear may spoil the flooring.
· It is their cultural or personal practice not to wear footwear at home.
Any reason that a client gives for requesting the removal of footwear is valid. But,
you must decide for yourself whether it is safe to do so.


I am not sure this document was really necessary. The guidelines seem remarkably commonsensical:

· Is there a risk of hurting your feet on objects on the floor, or because of the
condition of the floor, e.g. toys, books, tools etc. on the floor, loose floor
boards or nails sticking up?
· Is there a risk of hurting your feet because of the nature of equipment you will
be using, e.g. will you be using a hoist?
· Would taking off your shoes increase the chance of you slipping, e.g. on
polished floors?
· Is there a risk of cross infection, e.g. by stepping on animal or human
excrement, urine or other bodily fluids that may be on the floor?
· Will removing your shoes increase your sense of vulnerability in an already
uncomfortable situation, e.g. has the client been verbally abusive and you may
need to leave promptly?
· Do you have any injuries to your feet, which may mean that you need to
particularly avoid further harm to them, e.g. injuries that may easily become
infected by exposure to infective material?

No comments: