Thursday, October 02, 2008

South Korean Nightclubs

I have read that some South Korean nighclubs require patrons to remove their shoes. That sounds cool. I suppose it would prevent one's toes being squashed on the dance floor by sharp heels.

I can't imagine a British nightclub having a shoes-off policy. The few nightclubs I have been to (I would not want to encourage people to go to nightclubs) were pretty dirty places. You might not want to be shoeless in them. Of course, one occasionally saw girls going shoeless on the dance floor, but I am not sure they would have taken their shoes off if they had not been drinking.

16 comments:

Anonymous said...

It'd be teaching for shoes-on people to learn celebrities who practice shoes-off at homes. I know Madonna does

Celestial Fundie said...

Thanks for the comment. Have you visited or commented before?

Yes, I have heard that Madonna requires shoes-off in her house, though I have never found an article to prove this.

When I hear about celebrities who have shoeless homes, I will post about them, but you do not hear private details like that so often.

If you know of any celebrities who keep shoes-off homes, please tell me and I will post about them. It would be helpful if you could give a source.

God Bless

Matthew

richyrich said...

Gwyneth Paltrow asks all visitors to her home to take their shoes off. John Lennon and Yoko Ono also did (Yoko being Japanese came from a culture where that is the norm)

richyrich said...

So do these Korean nightclubs provide any kinds of slippers to their patrons or do they just go barefoot or in their socks or stockings whilst they are there. And where are the shoes put whist they are there, do they get put in a room like coats are and people then get tickets that they hand in to claim them back when they leave?

Celestial Fundie said...

Rich thanks for reminding us about Paltrow and Lennon/ Ono.

I am afraid I have never been to South Korea and I dont know how common these nightclubs are.

I believe patrons have stocking or bare feet.

God Bless

Matthew

richyrich said...

I believe patrons have stocking or bare feet.

It must feel strange walking around a nightclub like that, unless of course these clubs have good quality carpets, in which case it could be quite comfortable.
Like you I have sometimes seen females in the U.K. having taken their shoes off in them (especially to dance) as their heels hurt. However, as there is no safe place for them to put their shoes, they often have to carry them around with them so as to make sure they don't lose them.
Actually some years ago now, I was in a nightclub and spent some time in the company of this woman who had taken her high heeled shoes off, and she was holding them in her hands all the time and there was some noticable smell of feet coming from their direction!

If the club had had a place for removed shoes to be kept, thise wouldn't have happened!

Celestial Fundie said...

You have to remember that British and Korean cultures are very different.

There are very few places in the UK where removing shoes is required, while in South Korea, peole have to take off their shoes in all kinds of places, for instance university campuses and dentist's clinics.

Anonymous said...

Gwyneth Paltrow is from a noble UK family, isn't she? It is especially worth mentioning to argue against those who say shoes-off is a bad manner of "lower classes".
I read in Sweden shoes off is common in all the society including the Royals.
Yacht parties are a special topic, where shoes off is common.
I offer to create a special blog (or sub-blog) on Shoes-off Celebrity Homes to popularize the policy including pictures if possible.
Unexpectedly, the policy now is a bit changing in countries like Russia an other ex-Soviet ones, where people traditionally follow the rule, but now sometimes want to adopt shoes-on 'cause it seems to them more "European". They don't know about Scandinavia, Canada, some parts of the US etc.

Celestial Fundie said...

Anonymous, if you create such a blog I will give it a very prominent link on the sidebar. Please do.

But are you really prepared to spend all that time trawling through celebrity magazines?

"Gwyneth Paltrow is from a noble UK family, isn't she? It is especially worth mentioning to argue against those who say shoes-off is a bad manner of "lower classes"."

With respect to you, I think shoes-off is more common amongst the lower classes and removing shoes is considered tacky by the well-heeled.

I think upper class people only remove their shoes after they have been out hunting. But then I dont get invited to upper class homes, so how would I know?

"I read in Sweden shoes off is common in all the society including the Royals."

Really? I read somewhere that in Sweden, the upper classes look down on the shoes-removing lower classes.

Or maybe the upper classes just change to indoor shoes and its stocking feet they laugh at.

"Yacht parties are a special topic, where shoes off is common."

Yes, shoes-off is required on yachts no matter how rich and famous you are.

"Unexpectedly, the policy now is a bit changing in countries like Russia an other ex-Soviet ones, where people traditionally follow the rule, but now sometimes want to adopt shoes-on 'cause it seems to them more "European". They don't know about Scandinavia, Canada, some parts of the US etc."

I read an article the other day that said that Russia's super-rich are getting hit by the global credit crisis and the ostentatious parties are on their way out. That might slow down the trend against shoelessness.

Russia will never be the west.

Her winter climate will keep shoes-off common and for all the good things that Putin has done for Russia, I doubt that her streets are going to get much cleaner in the next five years.

God Bless

Matthew

Anonymous said...

Dear Matthew,
I originate from a university professor/scholar family, so it is not an upper-class, but a middle-class one. In my environment shoes-off is by default. Actually, upper and middle classed are mixed a lot through family relations, and my experience shows shoes-off is common in homes of Parliament Members, millionaires, etc.
Yet upper classes are different in different countries; probably, in the UK they never follow shoes-off. However, I once read a related comment from a Swedish girl (whose parents also belonged to the university professors), whose opinion I cited in my previous post. She said however rich a Swedish family was (especially noting"even a princess"), their practice shoes off in informal situations. I also read they change for indoor shoes when a party is very formal, but it depends as well. Anyway, in fact, Scandinavian countries are really democratic including royal and top families, whose lifestyle is quite simple in many, if not in all, situations and aspects.

Shoes-off yacht parties are an indicator, that upper classes are not against the idea in principle, and the next step seems quite logical. After all, the tendency represented by some celebrities is an evidence.

As to Russia and other ex-Soviet countries (including mine), you are completely right: shoes-on proponents are few, but their philosophy is nurtured by soap operas, which, unfortunately, all the time demonstrate shoes-on characters in home interiors. I read once analogous comments by a Canadian and a Turkish, who said you could never guess their countries were shoes-off from their TV programs!

Anonymous said...

I've forgotten to finalize: shoes-off by celebrities can be a key factor to popularize the policy. As soon as people see it is not a "bad manner" for celebrities anymore, they will realize the benefits.

Celestial Fundie said...

Thanks for your comments.

It would be nice if you could leave a name (clikc the name/URL box) when leaving comments. That would distinguish you from other anonymous commenters.

Where are you from? I do like to know where commenters are from. Or are you the Georgian person who has commented before (that is why it is nice to have a name or nickname)?

"I've forgotten to finalize: shoes-off by celebrities can be a key factor to popularize the policy. As soon as people see it is not a "bad manner" for celebrities anymore, they will realize the benefits."

When you start your celebrity blog, please give me either a link or the URL. I can then put up a link to it.

"Actually, upper and middle classed are mixed a lot through family relations, and my experience shows shoes-off is common in homes of Parliament Members, millionaires, etc."

That is nice to know.

"Anyway, in fact, Scandinavian countries are really democratic including royal and top families, whose lifestyle is quite simple in many, if not in all, situations and aspects."

Yes, Scandinavian society is more egalitarian.

"As to Russia and other ex-Soviet countries (including mine), you are completely right: shoes-on proponents are few, but their philosophy is nurtured by soap operas, which, unfortunately, all the time demonstrate shoes-on characters in home interiors. I read once analogous comments by a Canadian and a Turkish, who said you could never guess their countries were shoes-off from their TV programs!"

It is odd that people are seldom shoeless in t.v. and films.

Like some of these American soaps set in Seattle and New York. Removing shoes is never seen in these soaps (except for that infamous Sex and the City episode), even though it is common in those cities.

Maybe it is because it is inconvenient and time consuming for actors to remove shoes when entering homes in the programmes.

God Bless

Matthew

Anonymous said...

yeah, it is me, a guy from Georgia)

Celestial Fundie said...

I am glad.

When the fighting broke out a month ago, I was very worried about you.

Anonymous said...

thank you, I appreciate, yet fighting always seems scarier from a far ), so i was not in danger and most people here either

Celestial Fundie said...

Oh good.