Tuesday, December 02, 2008

Prayer Meeting Yesterday

It was the prayer meeting at the pastor's house yesterday.

It was quite a cold night (it did not stop me wearing my flip flops though!) and the pastor said:

"If anybody has cold feet, you can put your shoes on. You don't have to take your shoes off tonight."


A polite gesture. Personally, I would assume that if people know they need to take their shoes off, they will bring slippers if they are worried about getting their feet cold. However, if somebody in socks asked to put their shoes back on when it was cold, I would not make a fuss. If they were not wearing socks, I would offer to lend them some first though.

2 comments:

Moderate Mouse said...

I've seen you mention before that your pastor's house is a shoe-free zone. Now, what I'm about to ask may be a silly question. When Bible studies and prayer meetings take place, are people on the floor, or is it a strictly "high furniture" affair? By "high furniture" I mean sitting at a regular, meal height table or otherwise up in chairs.

I'm asking this knowing that in Japan, shoes off indoors is the rule in most, if not all, situations. While I'm not a proponent of the shoes-off culture, I will say that in Japan's defense, in private homes at least, when people sit, it's usually on the floor, no? I read somewhere that the closer one lives to the floor, the more likely they are to "eschew the shoe". I can kind of see why. It's not because of what the shoes might have on the bottom, although that too can be bad. Rather, at least when one is kneeling, the shoes, at least ones like heels, platforms, and (as I recently learned the hard way) athletic tennis shoes, can literally be a pain in the you-know-what. The same can be said of religions whose places of worship are also shoe-free zones.

I don't know why, but if I'm sitting on a couch or in a chair, and in socks/stockings alone or barefeet, I'm more tempted to sit with my feet curled up beneath me if not otherwise on the furniture, which may not always be acceptable. Whereas, if I'm in a situation where I'm expected to keep my feet on the floor even when the rest of me will be nowhere near the floor, I feel more fortitude in doing so when I have on shoes or at least slippers (preferably ones that blend with the decorum of the rest of my ensemble, however formal or informal). That's just me.

If what I have said is too offensive or irrelevant to this post, I apologize and will not be offended if you decide to get rid of my comments.

Celestial Fundie said...

Thanks for your comment.

"When Bible studies and prayer meetings take place, are people on the floor, or is it a strictly "high furniture" affair? By "high furniture" I mean sitting at a regular, meal height table or otherwise up in chairs."

Most people sit on chairs. The Bible studies can get packed out a bit, so some of the younger people sit on the floor.

"I will say that in Japan's defense, in private homes at least, when people sit, it's usually on the floor, no?"

In Japan people sit on the floor a bit more often than people in the west. But chairs are still used in homes.

God Bless

Matthew