Saturday, January 30, 2010

Santarosamom.com: Shoes Off at the Door!

Santarosamom.com: Shoes Off at the Door!

17 comments:

Anonymous said...

Just found your site.

There arte a lot of interseting remarks, but I have to say I can't really understand the fuss about shoe removal in offices.

I work as a secreatary for a firm of solicitors in Hereford. At this time of year I usually wear knee-length high heeled boots to work, but take them off in the office and just go in my stokinged feet, even in front of clients.
No one has ever complained and very few people even comment.

Wearing my boots all day in a warm office would be un-comfortable. I suppose I am lucky because the office has plush carpets throughout so it is really comfy underfoot as well.

Sian.

Celestial Fundy said...

Thanks for visiting, Sian.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your welcome.

I hoe you can understand my point of view in discarding my boots under my desk!!

Sian.

Celestial Fundy said...

I certainly can and do that myself.

Of course, this blog is about removing shoes in homes, rather than at work.

Do you ask or encourage people to remove their shoes in your home?

Anonymous said...

Yes absolutely, - sorry I realise it is about homes not offices, - it was just that I saw a few comments about offices so thought I would add my thoughts.

Yes I do ask people to remove their shoes in my home, and I always remove my shoes or boots even if they don't have a shoes off policy when visiting others. I just prefer leaving my footear at the door. It is more comfy and I don't to need to worry that I might have stepped in something un-pleasant!!

Sian.

Celestial Fundy said...

A lot of people seem to bring up removing shoes at work. Not that, I mind and I have posted a few times about that.

Maybe somebody should write a blog on going shoeless at work; if they can find enough to say about.

I used to live in Worcester and not many people that I knew had shoe-free homes (under my definition that means shoes-off for visitors as well as family).

Do you know many who request shoes-off in Hereford?

Sandro said...

Frankly, I think that shoes-off at homes and that at offices are two sides of one culture, removing shoes indoors. Shoes have been invented for outdoors; on the other hand, offices are often like our homes, to some extent

Celestial Fundy said...

True. Offices often have frightfully dirty carpets from traffic.

Anonymous said...

Hi,

Not sure whether it's just my circle of friends, but I would say that quite a lot have a shoes off policy at home, and even those who don't have a formal policy often go sholess at home.

I know what you mean about office carpets, as I mentioned before I am lucky that wee have plush carpets in out office and they are cleaned nightly, so no problems going in my stockinged feet!!

By the way I think it's great that you take your shoes off in work. Do you just go in socks?

I wish more guys would do this. One of the junior partners in our office often walks around the office just in socked feet with his shoes off!!

Sian.

Sandro said...

Not to dirty the floor, I take my shoes off at the office, but have to put on slippers as it is tiled over there and cold as a result; in summer I will just stay in socks
Dear Sian, could you please tell how you have adopted this policy? Did your parents teach you this?

Celestial Fundy said...

Sian, in socks these days, though I have gone bare foot until a certain manager banned us from wearing flip flops at our services.

Anonymous said...

Hi Sandro,

Yes my parents always taught me not to wear shoes at home or in other peoples homes.

Also, my Mother encouraged me to take my shoes off in school when the weather was bad and just go in my socked or stockinged feet.

In terms, of in the office where where I work now, when I started here one of the other secreaties never wore shoes in the office which encouraged me, - not that I needed much persuading anyway!!

Sian.

Sandro said...

Sian, thank you for clarifying! don't you think stockinged feet can look elegant enough?

Anonymous said...

Hi Sandro,

Sorry I am unsure what you mean?

I think stockinged feet are fine.

As you may have gathered from my earlier posts, when indoors, really wherever,I am usually in my stockinged feet.

Basically, I just wear shoes or boots to get from one place to another.

Sian.

Sandro said...

Some people argue against shoes-off saying that shoes are a part of outfit. I think stockinged feet not only provide for comfort and and cleanliness, but also look the most proper for indoors, while shoes are for outdoors and look improper as do coats

Moderate Mouse said...

"Some people argue against shoes-off saying that shoes are a part of outfit. I think...shoes are for outdoors and look improper as do coats"

Quite frankly, there are times when shoes are part of an outfit, especially if it's something along the lines of a business suit or a formal gown or tux. For times when I dress up, I consider "dress shoes" to be a finishing touch, not necessarily a focal point. Even if no one notices is my shoes, I'd feel very awkward being unshod while I otherwise have a certain amount of formality to maintain in dress and/or demeaner. (Now, if you'd be okay with shoe-like slippers, I'd go with that.)

It's interesting how you refute the "shoes as part of an outfit" by saying that (if I understand correctly) ALL shoes, even "dress shoes" are just as inappropriate for indoors as are coats. I hate to break it to you, but sometimes, there's a certain type of coat--often called a blazer--that sometimes plays a role in one's ensemble. In fact, this type of "coat" (a black one) was part of my outfit today at a relative's funeral, as did the shoes I wore (which were Mary Janes). Did I choose the aforementioned "coat" with the intent of ONLY wearing it outside? Not really (though it made for a good layer at the cemetery, I'll admit that). I meant for it to be part of my outfit regardless of whether I was inside or outside. The same was true with the shoes I chose to wear. In any kind of dress up situation, if I had to choose between being shod (even if I had to settle for shoe-like slippers) and a blouse that stood alone on my upper half with no blazer in the picture or wearing a blazer (or any kind of coat/jacket for that matter) with stand alone socks/stockings (if I'm lucky) from the ankle down, I'm afraid it would not be the latter (especially if I can't even fall back on sitting with my feet curled up beneath me). So, let me ask you this, if the acceptability of shoes of ANY style, material, etc., indoors were to cease to exist in ALL homes and offices, would you be okay with a potential boycott of the blazer (or any kind of coat/jacket designed to play a part in an ensemble), or do you feel there should be circumstances under you would not allow shoes but expect a person to wear a blazer at all times? (BTW, there are some ladies' blazers designed to be worn without a blouse underneath, but to make things easier, I'd like to assume that the blazer in question IS designed to be worn with a shirt/blouse of some sort.)

Sandro said...

Dear Moderate Mouse,
thank you for your inspiring post. Theoretically, shoes should never be worn indoors because they have been invented to protect our feet. As to aesthetic reasons, they develop as a result of practical necessity. Therefore, stockinged/bare feet match indoor environment more than anything else.
Regarding jackets/shoes being parts of one's outfit, I should say outfit should be relevant for environment i.e. a fur coat looks strange if worn indoors. Personally, I always take off any jacket of mine when entering any premise for longer than a couple of minutes. If a jacket is OK for outdoor weather, then it must be too warm for indoors and so looks not matching it aesthetically as well.
Yet why I have written "theoretically" at the beginning of my post: there are premises and occasions when shoes and jackets on are rather OK.
I mean formal events in places specially designed for such purposes. Premises of this kind don't provide for privacy spirit enough to feel the need of taking shoes off, though it would be still better to avoid toxins and protect floors. I mean large restaurant parties/conferences. Definitely, it is not about homes.