Saturday, March 06, 2010

Modern Simplicity: 37 Reasons Why You Should Have a Shoes-Off Policy

Modern Simplicity: 37 Reasons Why You Should Have a Shoes-Off Policy

Sandy at Modern Simplicity was nice enough to link here and quote my 37 reasons.

11 comments:

Moderate Mouse said...

I understand most of the reasons listed, at least to a certain extent. One of the ones I have trouble with is the one about entering a frame of mind of leaving behind everyday troubles. It may be easy to do that when you've got a job where your obligations for the office, factory, etc., remain there but not so easy when you're a student and to some extent have to do homework (i.e. routine paperwork to fill out, pages to read, papers to write, projects to put together) and not to mention study for upcoming quizzes/tests, in which case the "study time" becomes an extension of the school day more or less. (Not that homework in and of itself requires shoes per se, but if, and I do mean if, wearing shoes puts a person in the "down to business" mind frame needed to study/do homework, so be it.)

The only one I don't get at all is the one about having a slipper to hand when chastising children. What's that about?

I think that if I were to add to the list at all (even though I'm still torn on the whole concept of banning shoes from the private home), one would be that the less often you wear the shoes in question, the longer they will last (which is especially good if you only own a few pairs at most, commute on foot a lot and/or are especially active outside the home), and another would be if your trying to quit smoking (and assuming that the smoking only happens outside) the fact that you would have to put the shoes on just to go smoke and then take them back off when you come in and having to do that repeatedly could (not sure if it actually will) help you rethink whether or not you "need" that next cigarette. (I'm pretty sure I mentioned the latter in a previous post a long time ago. Maybe you could bring that up if you're around someone who mentions trying to quit smoking.)

Celestial Fundy said...

That is true about troubles at home.

With regard to the chastising thing, I am totally in favour of the corporal punishment of children and a slipper is a good implement to use for it.

Sandro said...

In a forum, a girl from Germany/Luxembourg said most people around her practised shoes-off at homes. Hadn't known for Luxembourg

Celestial Fundy said...

Interesting.

From what I have read, removing shoes is the norm in former- communist eastern Germany, but not so common in western parts.

richyrich said...

I wonder what is the reason for the practice to be more common in the eastern parts of Germany than it is in the western parts.

Celestial Fundy said...

Maybe the lack of bourgeois influence.

Sandro said...

Aren't Austrians and Swedes bourgeois enough? ) they still remove their shoes indoors

Celestial Fundy said...

With Sweden you might have a left-wing proletarian thing going on.

Austria is a bit bourgeois, I suppose, but not as much as western Germany.

Austria was once an east european empire with a largely peasent population.

Celestial Fundy said...

Okay, Sandro I know I am being grossly speculative in my suggestion that this is down to social and economic history and I have zero evidence, but don't you think that this is more interesting than saying it is down to colder winters?

Sandro said...

I agree there are many factors in different combinations:
1)tradition
2)weather
3)flooring fashion
4)spouses' and friends' habits
5)social position
About Swedes: I definitely know university professors do practice it there, but I don't think they are proletarian )
Yet what is true about Scandinavians they are so democratic that even minister take trains as usual passengers and wash windows at home, and prime-ministers go to cinema without security what may cost them their lives (you know whom I mean)
I mean such people won't consider shoes-off a mauvais ton

Celestial Fundy said...

I think the casual thing in Scandinavia has a big impact on removing shoes.