Saturday, June 26, 2010

Shoe Covers

re-post

Occasionally some people suggest shoe covers as an alternative to shoe-removal.

I have expressed scepticism before that shoe covers can be worn with high heeled shoes. I find it impossible to imagine what an high-heeled shoe with a cover on would look like. Shirley Saunders supports my suspicion. She points out in her book that shoe covers can be damaged by high heeled shoes.

From an aesthetic point of view, I would not want people walking about my home in covered shoes. I want it to be a place of relaxation not a crime scene. In any case, I think most people would feel sillier and more self-conscious in shoe covers than in socks or bare feet.

19 comments:

Sandro said...

I think nobody supports the idea of shoe-covers. Even if my private English students are reluctant about shoes-off (three people for ten years) they never offer this idea to me as a compromise.

Celestial Fundy said...

Supposing one of your students bought some shoe covers to wear What would you say?

Moderate Mouse said...

Something I noticed in the second paragraph is where you probably meant to say "A high-heeled shoe", it reads as "AN high-heeled shoe [emphases mine]". If the latter is correct according to the standards you were taught regarding grammar, then I ask your forgiveness for pointing that out, but I wanted to bring that to your attention in case it's not and you wish to re-post that later on.

Celestial Fundy said...

Traditionally that is correct English. An helicopter. An husband. An hundred.

Sadly, this rule is largely ignored. After my PhD examination, I was told to correct all examples of this rule in my thesis and use 'a' before H.

Sandro said...

I am not a native speaker, and such interference may seem not very proper while two native speakers are discussing the language issues, yet I was taught it depends on whether "h" is pronounced; therefore, one should write "an hour" and "a husband"

regarding shoe-covers, I would be too surprised to say anything

Sandro said...

I think, even tramplians around the Caucasus would never consider shoe-covers as an option and would instead prefer just removing shoes. As to offalists, they would consider the shoe-cover policy as that of a neat-freak.

Kev said...

Grammatically I'm with Sandro: "an hour", "a half-hour"; surely though it would be "one hundred"?

Moderate Mouse said...

"I was taught it depends on whether "h" is pronounced"

Me too.

As far as shoe covers go, I could maybe see that working in a normally "shoe-free" home if 1) If the nature of the task being performed in the home is too risky to do unshod, such as installing a large appliance or 2)the amount of time one intends to be in the home in question is not even long enough to justify putting removing one's jacket (depending on weather and/or time of year).

But barring high safety risks (wherever applicable) or exceptionally tight time constraints, I'm with you all that shoe covers are probably not as good of an option as actual shoe removal. (BTW, I've never worn shoe covers before, let alone with heels. I don' wear heels very often if ever.)

Sandro said...

IMHO feet are part of indoor outfit, while shoe-covers just look as if one were in a hospital )

Celestial Fundy said...

Or a forensic investigation scene, Sandro.

Celestial Fundy said...

Kev, if you ever have tea with the Queen, you had better say an husband, an helicopter or an hundred.

Sandro said...

CF, as an English instructor/interpreter and a great fan of what is known as the Queen's English, I would appreciate any link to a resource considering this rule in details

Kev said...

I would like to believe HM appreciating me being myself, as that's probably why I'd be there having tea :) At a guess, English grammar had its formative heyday when most people talked more like The Wurzels than traditional B.B.C. announcers; it's too clumsy to translate to everyday speech, hence people don't go around speaking Latin.

Shoe covers? No.

Celestial Fundy said...

Grammar question

If you read the King James translation of the Bible (the greatest work of English ever), you will find the use of 'an hundred' and other examples of 'an before H'

Sandro said...

thanks, CF

Kev said...

Shakespeare's not considered shoddy either, but when did people last write or speak like him?

Also, I bet his creative juices didn't start flowing over the notion of his home being treated like an operating theatre or crime scene. Museum to himself, maybe...

Moderate Mouse said...

While I think there may be select circumstances where shoe covers might work (see my last post; my name is in black as I had trouble posting under my blogger account for some reason), it's too easy for them to make it look like you're protecting your SHOES if you really think about it. (However, I wouldn't mind an "outdoor" version of said covers for those rainy/snowy days. That way, I could simply take the covers off when I enter a public place.) For most of the indoor stuff that I do in my own home or (as it currently stands my sister's home), I'd sooner stick to one of my pairs of ballet flat slippers or my blue "at home" flip-flops, thank you.

Shifting gears, I can't believe the discussion that my grammar comment had started regarding whether to use "an" or "a" before a word beginning with "h". I never thought the issue would be THAT controversial.

Anonymous said...

Here is my question... what do "YOU" do to accomodate disabled visitors? I understand the desire to keep your floors clean... but do you deny entry to your home to keep your floors clean or make an exception? Personally, I wear orthodic inserts and find my legs and feet hurt if I walk barefoot for prolonged periods of time, several family members wear leg braces which require shoes to keep them in place and provide cushioning.

Celestial Fundy said...

I am happy to make an exception for anyone with a medical complaint or disability.

Just tell me you can't take them off. No need to give me any embarassing details. You will be excused.