Thursday, December 16, 2010

Warning! There Will Be No Warning

The British Department for the Environment, Farming, and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) has announced that farmers do not need to give prior notice before using pesticides on their crops.

This means that if you live in the UK you cannot be sure whether your area is contaminated by pesticides.

Regardless of whether this decision is right or wrong, it is vital that if you live in a rural area, you consider the risk of pesticide contamination. Your shoes may pick up traces of the stuff. Make sure you remove them at the door and ask visitors to remove their shoes.

10 comments:

Moderate Mouse said...

When was said announcement made? (I know it should be none of my concern since I live in the US and DEFRA's in the UK, which I have yet to have any cause to travel to. I was just curious.)

Celestial Fundy said...

Oh, I should have mentioned this is a UK thing.

I heard the news yesterday morning on the radio.

I have no idea what the regulations say about pesticides use in the USA.

Moderate Mouse said...

"I have no idea what the regulations say about pesticides use in the USA."

I'll probably have to check with the EPA on that one.

On an unrelated note, as you know, I generally wear slippers (which I'll maybe take off when lounging around) when up and about at home. Something I've been working on as further incentive to regard being without my shoes as regular part of being at home is doing more things that, of themselves, warrant being shoeless. Not counting showering or sleeping, the only two things for me that seem to fit this are checking my weight and updating my pedicure, but I can only do these things so often. So, what I might do early in the next year (if it's feasible) is take a pilates class that will be offered at the gym in my hometown. (For religious reasons, I'm hesitant to look into yoga.) In case you're unfamiliar with it, pilates is one of those things that is traditionally done without shoes, so I would generally be barefoot or in socks, depending on guidelines. It's scheduled to occur twice a week for six weeks at a time. While this is not the only reason I want to do this, I'm hoping that it will help me get more used to being shoeless at a time when I'm actually awake. (And maybe knowing that there will be a time in public when I will need to be without my shoes will help remind me of how much I DON'T need to be wearing them at home.)

Sandro said...

Today, a women with two children entered the kids' zone, carpeted one, in a car dealership. Passing by, I saw they hadn't removed their shoes. Maybe she had noticed my look, as few minutes later she removed the shoes, hers and her children's, and put them by the zone entrance.

Celestial Fundy said...

Is there a sign to indicate that it is a rule, or is just expected by everyone that shoes come off?

I have seen quite a few discussions about indoor play areas. A lot of parents don't make their children remove their shoes, then get really annoyed when other parents' intervene.

Sandro said...

it's by default, so no "shoes off" sign

richyrich said...

Yesterday (Sunday, 19 December) in the Sunday Times there was an interview with the Business Secretary in the UK Government, Dr Vince Cable. The interview was carried out at Dr Cable's home and there was a picture of him wearing a smart suit but with slippers on his feet. The interviewer also commented on his footwear. I have some recollection of reading about another interview that was carried out with Dr Cable at his home some months ago and it was mentioned there too that he was wearing slippers. I don't know whether or not Dr Cable operates a shoes off policy at his home (the interviewer made no mention about him being asked to take off his shoes)but his first wife was Indian, a culture where shoe removal in homes is the norm if I'm correct. However he clearly wasn't embarrassed about being seen wearing slippers with a formal suit. No one else who's dressed formally should feel embarrassed when removing their shoes at someone's home either, not even if it's a fomral occassion.

Celestial Fundy said...

Good for him. Not a politician I particularly admire, but that's one up on Ed Miliband.

Sandro said...

Was the interviewer with the shoes off?

Sandro said...

Sorry, wasn't attentive enough; no need to reply