Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Another Colleague Has A Shoes-Off Policy

At the office today we had a really heated discussion about religion, in which I argued for the certainty of the absolute truth of the Christian faith. This was followed by a more light-hearted discussion about the subject of removing my shoes, with reference to my blog.

One of my colleagues revealed that she always removes her shoes when visiting others and expects others to remove their shoes in her home. An older colleague admitted that she usually wore shoes in her home, but said that removing shoes was something that made a lot of sense and that she might give it a go.

21 comments:

jhamon said...

We always had a no shoe policy for ourselves and I would always clean the floors whenever anyone visited. We have a two year old and I just think it is gross to let him walk around on the floors when people have been wearing their shoes in public restrooms, etc. I was recently put on bed rest with twins and my husband doesn't have the time to clean the floors after every visitor bringing us food, etc. So, we bought two baskets for people to put their shoes in and some foot slip covers for those who didn't want to remove their shoes. My father came over last night and was so offended that we asked him to take off his shoes or put on slippers that he left. He actually left and my two year old didn't know why papaw didn't want to stay and play with him. It was horrible. After talking to him today he said it will be a long time before he can visit again. He has never been so offended and thinks I'm a germ freak. Any thoughts or recommendations on how to handle this? I'd really like this to be a new policy with our family even when I'm off bedrest. With twins and a two year old I don't have time to mop my floors every time someone comes to visit. It's exhausting and probably why I'm on bed rest in the first place. Any advice on how to ask people gently or whether I should just let it go is appreciated.

Celestial Fundy said...

You should continue to ask people politely to remove their shoes. Very few people are going to be unreasonable about it like that.

I get asked often how to handle people who are acting unreasonably like your father is clearly being. It is difficult for me to comment because I do not know him personally. Naturally, you will want to handle the situation delicately, but you have to make known your feelings.

Anonymous said...

My girlfriend woeks in a travel agents and wesar slippers in work as she say shoes hurt her feet.

Celestial Fundy said...

Anonymous, thanks for dropping in.

That seems to be more common than one might expect.

What do you think about removing shoes in homes?

Anonymous said...

hi

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I posted

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I posted on here a week or two ago about the shoes off policy introduced at my daughter's school because of the refuse collection problems.

Sorry, I have'nt been back since and realise a couple of questions were asked.

The first thing to mention is that although our recycling rubbish has been collected, our black bags have'nt so we still have problems with rubish on the pavements and the ban is still in place.

My daughter is 15 so it is what you would call a secondary school, although it is in fact private. There are boarders, although my daughter is a day pupil. Also, there have been problems with the school's refuse collection which is partly why the shoes off was was bought in.

There are a number of different buildings and at the entrance to each they have placed racks for the pupils to place their shoes on. The ban does also apply to staff as someone asked, and it is being strictly enforced as they don't want any pupils walking in dirty shoes when other are shoeless.

They can either change into plimsols or slippers or just go sholess.

My daughter has chosen just to go shoeless. They have a strict uniform (for the girls blazer and skirt). I think this is stricter than in the state schools.
Anyway, she just goes shoeless in her stockinged feet.

I think there is a real mix between those who do this and those who change.

I have omly spoken to one teracher about it, an English teacher who said she felt it had led to much cleaner floors and a better envioroment. If it is of interest she is in her early to mid 30's and was in slippers. She agreed that it would be a good idea to make it permanent and said she liked not having to wear shoes all day.

This is a real problem because you can walk on the rubbish strewn pavements, and your shoe soles look clean, but in my opinion they can't be with germs and stuff.

Although, we always have a shoes off policy at home and have done for ages it is obviously really important with this problem.

I have asked the school to consider making it permanent, but doubt they will.

In my opinion it can only be good in helping youngsters get into the shoes off habit, although to be fair my daughter is fairly good and takes hers off at friends and when she comes to my office after schhol even before this ban was introduced. I think she has been well trained!!

I hope this answerrs the questions but if anyone wants more info please let me know.

I will look back more often in future - I promise.

Julie.

Celestial Fundy said...

Julie, thankyou so much for coming back and commenting.

Anonymous said...

Thank - you,

You may have mentioned this before, so sorry if you have, but do you think the shoes off in school thing is a good idea?

I have spoken to some parents who are in favour and others not - fairly evenly balanced.

I can't really see any objection especially as they can change into other footwear if they want.

Julie.

Celestial Fundy said...

I certainly do. It is what they do in a number of countries, such as Finland.

Anonymous said...

I did'nt know that.

My daughter school is fairly strict on uniform and appeance, but it amazes seeing kids (boys and girls) going to the local secondary. Some of them are wearing shoes that are completley muddy (not just a little but covered in mud and boys with muddy trousers).

Julie.

Sandro said...

Dear Julie,
your family experience should be highly appreciated.
PS. Maybe it could make sense to survey the school students' parents (e.g. online) and submit a kind of petition to the school administration if the majority vote for the shoes-off policy all the time? Actually, it would only protect those

richyrich said...

Julie,

Thanks for your comments and your replies to my queries. As I've previously said on here before you started contributing to it (and I apologise to other readers for repeating myself here)when I was at primary school (a state one in the 1970's)we moved to a new buiklding which had carpets in the classrooms. There was a lot of grass outside which got very muddy when it was raining and as a result our shoes would often get dirty if we were playing there. As a result the school made a rule that ditry shoes would have to be taken off and left outside the classroom. We were allowed to change into pumps if we wanted to and if we had them with us at school but most of us would just stay in our stockinged feet. One teacher in particular was strict in enforcing the policy, when we came back in after break or lunch hour and it was muddy outside, she'd inspect everyone's shoes and then say if they were clean enough to be kept on or if they had to come off. If she decided on the latter, there was no argument to be had about it! It certainly seemed to work in keeping thee classrooms mud free. It only applied though if it was muddy outside and only to the pupils.
However I must say that I am a little bit surprised that pupils are allowed to pad around the school without any footwear at all in this day and age, given the current concerns about health and safety. Do you know if any staff at the school go around in stockinged feet or barefooted?

Sandro said...

sorry, only now do I see I've posted my message unfinished; I wanted to say shoes-off policy will only protect those who want to stay shoeless, while others can just change into other shoes. So the shoes-off actually is the best solution to satisfy everyone.

Sandro said...

richyrich,
if it's carpeted everywhere, there should be no risk IMHO

PS. I wish I had been required to walk shoeless in my school!

Sandro said...

I don't remember if I already said this, the shoes-off policy in the Caucasus is based on strict distinction between home and public environment, not between the indoors and outdoors. It is considered against etiquette to stay in shoes at homes and remove shoes anywhere else (unless it's a mosque, shoe shop, beach, etc.) respectively.
Maybe that's why floors in public premises including schools were never in good condition.
Now many schools and offices have been renovated including floor, but shoes-on practice surprisingly is not swept away.
Only doctors and especially nurses as well as, mostly if females, shop assistants, barbers, waitresses, etc.
change into slippers at work as a usual practice (yet they have always done it as a matter of comfort). In a Turkish restaurant in Baku, I saw waitresses
wear white socks and slippers as part of uniform.

Maketta said...

I think one should ask people to remove their shoes when they come in your house. It's not rude. I know I wouldn't be offended if someone asked me to remove my shoes.

P.S. Thanks for stopping by my blog.

Sandro said...

Hi Maketta,
I fully agree with you; asking so is only hospitable: your guest may want to take his/her shoes off, and your request will only confirm he/she is welcome to do this.
Of course, in countries where shoes-off is common, there is no need to ask.
Is it common to remove one's shoes in Michigan?

Celestial Fundy said...

Thanks for dropping in, Maketta.

Maketta said...

Sandra- Yes, a lot of people remove their shoes in Michigan there are a lot of people here from the middle east and they remove their shoes before they come into the house.

Sandro said...

thank u