Saturday, February 05, 2011

A Rather Obvious Answer


re-post


"If you are so obsessed with keeping your floor clean, don't invite anybody to your home."

If you are so obsessed with what you are wearing, don't visit anybody's home.

26 comments:

Sandro said...

A good point, CF.
Tramplians don't care about the elegance of their appearance, but just have obsession with a certain part of their outdoor outfit, namely shoes.

Elizabeth said...

When I dress up for a party, I often wear longer pants or a dress that would look ridiculous without heels. I've never seen a party invitation that asks guests to remove shoes, either, even though that may be the case. I keep my shoes on anyway, and no one has ever said a word (though I keep them very clean). I'm pretty short and young-looking, so it helps to wear heels. I take my shoes off in my own home, and I wipe my feet very well when entering another person's home, anyway. If I'm not comfortable with my shoes off (bare feet, yuck!) then I don't remove them. It's courtesy to make guests comfortable at parties (within reason).

Sandro said...

Elizabeth,
apart from purely hygienic reasons (however well you wipe your shoes off, they bring extreme danger for people in homes), shoes are intended to protect our feet from outdoor mud, stones, etc.,
and are logically inappropriate indoors.
Aesthetic reasons are subjective and form as a result of purely practical ones.
We don't need shoes in home environment for practical reasons, so it makes sense to suppose wearing shoes in a private and cosy home environment has nothing with beauty. At the same time, there are many ways to make up a really elegant shoeless appearance regardless of one's height )

Eldar said...

I fully agree with Sandro. But I also appreciate the points made by Elizabeth. I understand that some people are not accustomed to remove shoes at other people´s homes, especially at parties. But it is all the question of getting used to it. For example, I had a female friend from Argentina. She obviously comes from a culture where shoes-off is almost unheard off. Yet she got used to it, and came to appreciate this custom. Also, as a good Latin woman, she is very aesthetically minded, and found ways to look very stylish without shoes - in elegant stockings in winter and in nicely pedicured bare feet to match the outfit in summers. There is absolutely nothing to regret about having to remove shoes at parties. To the contrary, it can even enhance your looks!:) Just take it easy and with a sense of humour.

Sandro said...

well done, Eldar )

Celestial Fundy said...

Elizabeth, thanks for visiting and sharing your thoughts.

I must say that if you take your shoes off in your home, it surely would not be a great hardship to attend a party where shoes-off was expected.

Eldar said...

Sandro, I understand that in your country women too are very aesthetically minded when it comes to appearing shoeless at parties?

Sandro said...

yes they are, and most of them avoid slippers though rarely admit they understand stockinged feet look better

Celestial Fundy said...

Would either you consider setting up shoes-off blogs in your native languages (I assume you have not already)?

Sandro said...

There's no need for blogs as everyone considers it a normal thing to remove one's shoes at home. Yet there are tons of forums related, where I always advocate shoes off esp. in office, which we obviously lack.

Anonymous said...

Why is there so much fuss made about shoe removal in offices?

Invariably I do this.

The reason are simple - I have a long walk to work, as I don't own a car, and have to drop my son off at school on the way.

Also, I am a single mum on a tight budget, and only have one pair of work shoes.

Helen.

Celestial Fundy said...

Helen, thanks for visiting.

That does seem to be rather common. I suppose it would make for a more interesting discussion if some office managers started requiring this of staff.

What do you think of removing shoes in homes?

Celestial Fundy said...

Maybe a Russian-language blog might help to show the global context of the custom of removing shoes in homes. I imagine some people in some former Soviet countries might think of it as a rather parochial practice local only to their region.

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I live at the end of a muudy lane so always have shoes off in the house.

Helen.

Sandro said...

CF,
there are online materials in Russian which do emphasise removing shoes is global.
The issue is actively discussed in Russian forums as people face foreign cultures.
From my side, I always clarify the issue wherever possible.
Unfortunately, shoe-free offices are a rarity in my region due to:
1) excessively formal office environment/people's fear to look "unprofessional"
2) floor coverings not welcoming for socked/stockinged feet.
3)the tradition of strict distinction between homes and public environment
I guess it only could be started like a fashion by a popular foreign company. Otherwise, there is no chance for shoe-free offices as a common practice.

Sandro said...

When I say "a popular foreign company", I mean its branch in my country.

Moderate Mouse said...

As some of you may recall, almost a year ago, I started wearing slippers at home in place of actual shoes. (And it's just as well that I did because as of last week, we've had a lot of snow on the ground which I've walked through. Normally, I keep my shoes on until I hit the bedroom, but again, because of all the snow I've been walking through, I've got two of my pairs of shoes in the foyer as we speak. So far, nobody has said a word.)

Anyway, as of late, I've been working on having being focused on SOMETHING in the home (if not a household task, then maybe something mentally "active" such as reading a book or Sudoku puzzles) go hand-in-hand with my slipper habit. Being in my slippers is, if nothing else how I establish that I will be in the house for a while (like more than a few minutes), and if it has been established that I'm going to be in the house for a while, then I really ought to content myself with what sorts of things there are for me to do there (again, if not actual housework--though I feel it is in poor taste to be home all day and not touch any of the dishes in the sink--then perhaps actual housework, reading a book that has been sitting on the shelf for a while, catching up on email, etc.) instead of wasting my "home time" doing nothing but watch TV, staring off into space, or worse moving about my bedroom or anywhere else in the house without cause. (Yes, I do have that last habit. Don't ask me where it came from, but I'm working on not doing that anymore.)

Also, I'm beginning to wonder if it isn't more, um, edifying to the shoe-free home life if those of us who take part in it are, whenever time and health allow, regularly engaged in something at least somewhat constructive in the home (in connnection to the home or otherwise) than simply sitting around. (And to clarify, I'm talking about when you have something social going on in the home but more along the lines of when neither you nor anyone else in the home will be receiving company or someone else in your home will be receiving a guest, but said guest's "visit" does not pertain to YOU by any stretch of the imagination so you might as well go about your own business regardless of their presence.) After all, there are Tramplians who associate shoelessness with laziness, and I think if we're going to say that shoes have no place in the private home, this is an area that needs to be addressed more by the Offalist crowd since, I hate to say it but, even in the home, there's a time to relax but also a time to be engaged in something productive. (At least that's what I was more or less taught when I was growing up.)

richyrich said...

Helen,
Do you also ask visitors to your house to take their shoes off?

Sandro said...

Every time when cleaning ladies see I take my shoes off in an office not to mess up the floors they have just washed, they ask me obviously shocked why I do it. Their shock proves even harder to explain if one considers they are usually from the rural area neighbouring Azebaijan where, I mean the area, the shoes-off policy at homes is total with no exception.
An office whose boss I used to teach English, was located in a rented apartment. The boss and staff used to walk in slippers, and I doubtlessly removed my shoes. I cannot describe how much the boss tried to stop me every time!

Sandro said...

http://www.expats.cz/prague/article/czech-culture/sticking-to-the-rules/
"A Czech friend of mine recently told me about a faux pas she’d committed during a dinner party at an ambassador’s residence in Prague. Having arrived rather late, my friend was escorted by an attendant into the front hallway, where, seeing the plush Persian carpets inside, she promptly removed her shoes according to the local custom. In her stockinged feet, she rushed into the dining room. The other guests greeted her with looks of horror and barely-suppressed laughter. Everyone but my friend was wearing shoes."

I adore this Czech lady: she at least tried to be consistent following the shoes-off practice! She does respect her own culture..

Celestial Fundy said...

MM, I can't see anything quite specific enough to address in your comment.

Moderate Mouse said...

Now that I think about it, my comment was really something I should've brought up on my own blog (after I've fully determined how to avoid confusion). You'd think that, as someone with an English degree, I'd be an expert on properly getting my point across the first time out, but I'm not.

I apologize for wasting your time, and I will understand if you wish to delete my comment.

Sandro said...

MM, whatever you write, it's nice to have been reading your posts for these years )

Celestial Fundy said...

Quite right, Sandro.

MM, it's great that you keep sharing your thoughts.

Anonymous said...

This is the absolute funniest thing I have ever heard of! A blog about removing shoes at others homes!? If you need to ask guests to take their shoes off at your door, unless they are caked in mud or snow, then maybe you should just not entertain. If you care more about your decor, then just sit back by yourself and look at it. If it is for germs, then you are probably freaking out about someone being in your house anyway. I mean, do you think people should start wearing surgical gloves as well. There are after all, tons of germs on your hands as well. There is no logical reason I can come up with that would give someone a legitimate reason to ask an invited guest to take their shoes off. You should do whatever you choose in your own home, but maybe you should just stay there alone. I guess maybe it is just a matter of hospitality. And, maybe those who feel the need to start a blog about the removal of shoes should get out there and find someone to start a family with or start spending time with your family if you already have one instead of stressing about shoes in your home.
Believe me, life is so much more fun when you loosen up and live a little! Come on, try it. Wearing shoes in your home might be the doorway to lots of other exciting aspects of life!

Celestial Fundy said...

I am glad you felt the need to spend two or three minutes of your life telling me how to live mine.