Saturday, May 21, 2011

Treating other people with respect

re-post

We should always do our utmost to treat other people with respect.

All of us have little things that we are sensitive about. Other people might find it hard to understand those things and may think we are oversensitive about them. However, that does not mean that we should not take those things into consideration.

For instance, some people may not like to hear bad language. If so, you should try as hard as you can not to swear when in that person's company. You may think that is silly. You may think they have the problem, not you and they should deal with it. I disagree. I think that you should respect the fact that those people do not like bad language.

Some people may not like you to smoke when there children are present. You may think that is silly, after all they are not going to be affected by you smoking just one cigarette in front of them. However, perhaps these people do not want you to set an example to your children. You should respect that.

Likewise, some people do not want shoes to be worn inside their homes. This is something important to them.




You may think this is daft. If it is for cultural reasons you may think "They are living in the UK not in China." If it is to protect the carpet you may think "Carpets are meant to be walked on." That is fine. You are entitled to your opinion. However, you should still treat their preference with respect. They are fellow human beings who have the right to their preferences and opinions as much as you do. So please don't complain if you are asked to remove your shoes in such homes.

We should also not be afraid to state our preferences. Nobody is going to know that you would rather they avoided using bad language in front of their children unless you tell them this. In the same way nobody will know that you would like shoes-off in your house unless you make it clear. There is nothing wrong with expressing how you feel and asserting your wishes. You have the right to be respected.

2 comments:

Amber said...

I completely agree with you. My husband and I just moved back to the U.S. after living in Japan for four years. The thought of wearing shoes in the house is now repulsive to us, and we have a strict no-shoe policy. We recently moved into a new apartment (with new carpet) and the maintenance man showed up today for some necessary repairs. I VERY politely asked him to remove his shoes at the door and he flat out refused. I really didn't know what to say; it was such an awkward situation, so I just ended up letting him in anyway. I suppose I could have sent him away, but it's already taken so long just to get someone to show up in the first place. I can't believe the blatant disrespect of some people. What happened to a little common courtesy, especially when visiting another person's home, for business or otherwise? And to me, people who are completely comfortable wearing shoes in the house are the strange ones, not the other way around.

Matthew Celestis said...

Thanks for visiting and sharing your experiences.

I think the majority of people will happily remove their shoes. With those people who refuse, it's always a tough call whether to let them in or not.