Thursday, March 08, 2012

Daily Mail: Primary school bans children from wearing shoes indoors because they don't want to get the new carpet dirty

Daily Mail: Primary school bans children from wearing shoes indoors because they don't want to get the new carpet dirty

The Daily Mail ran an almost identical story to this last year. They don't half like to make a fuss.

Have a good look at the comments; most of them point out how sensible this rule is and the silliness of those complaining.

21 comments:

Mrs Anderson said...

I am not sure why this had caused such a fuss!!

I work in a small, rural priamry school in the UK. The pupils change into plimsolls in the school buildings.

Alos, I wear slippers in school and teach in them.

Matthew Celestis said...

Thanks so much for visiting and commenting.

A lot of the people commenting on that article also wondered what the big deal was with it.

Jane Anderson said...

Thanks - completely agree.

Our flors are'nt carpeted but I think it still makes sense and creates a more relaxed enviroment.

Matthew Celestis said...

I'm sure it does.

Jane Anderson said...

Thanks for replying.

I also have a shoes off rule at home.

Do you think it's ok to teach in slippers as I do?

Matthew Celestis said...

Of course. As long as they are not shaped like Porky Pig.

Sandro said...

Just want to share a link of a stockinged-feet dance party at a jazz club at SF, Calif. Shoes were off to protect the floor as it's written in the description. A good example against those who say a shoes-off dance party is inappropriate especially in public.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxI6MFiDLVw&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Matthew Celestis said...

Interesting that most of the band kept their shoes on. I could only see one musician with his shoes off.

Kaitlyn Gaum said...

Just came across your blog looking for advice on how to switch to a shoes off rule. I recently purchased a new home with all white carpeting throughout and an unfinished driveway and walk.

My family and I have been living shoes on for years and I think we are going to make the switch to a shoes off home, your blog makes some good points.

Sandro said...

Dear Kaytlin Gaum,
The shoes-off policy will be meaningless if not applied to everyone with no exception, visitors included. One pair of street shoes on is going to be enough to spoil your wonderful white carpet.

Sandro said...

Dear CF, I guess the point was to protect the hardwood. Therefore, the band was playing on a piece of fabric.

Matthew Celestis said...

Kaitlyn, that's excellent. Good for you.

KELLY said...

Jane - I work as a Teaching Assistant at a primary in the UK and invariable work stocking footed.

Matthew Celestis said...

Kelly, is that out of choice or because it is a rule?

Kelly said...

No it's not a rule. I started doing it after my shoes got mucky walking in over the palying fields.

Then just decided it was easier and more comfy going shoeless.

Sandro said...

Kelly. Is there anybody else following you? How do the faculty, staff and students react to your shoelesness?

Kaitlyn Gaum said...

I am fairly confident that my family and I will be able to adhere to a shoes off rule in the house. How do you go about getting friends and visitors to your home to remove their shoes when you have had a shoes on house for years?

Sandra said...

Dear Kaytlin, the question is quite difficult to answer as in my surroundings, shoes are taken off by default.
I'd advise answering the door in stockinged feet and some pairs of shoes obviously left in the lobby. Usually, it's a sufficient hint. However, I don't know if it's enough for the UK.
At the same time, not only is your demand very reasonable for you, but also provides for guests' comfort, hygiene, relaxation etc. Why not inform them in advance? Or if they still ignore the rule and hints (esp. as spontaneous visitors), why not simply ask?

Matthew Celestis said...

Kaitlyn, the thing is that it's not really a 'demand' at all. It's a polite request. We ask people to do things all the time. People talk about this as though it's some terrible thing to ask, but you are not asking them to strip to their underwear.

Most people will take their shoes off in their own homes and most people are used to wearing open-toed shoes, so they are unlikely to mind at all.

Just a polite request should do the trick. Be brave.

Anonymous said...

I don't agree with this article. I would much rather wear shoes or some type of footwear in all public places. However, it is important to note my school did not have carpeting in it and most students never worn shoes that were caked in mud.

Ever been by a men's bathroom urinal, by the way? Maybe you'll see the view point I have then.

I also think wearing shoes (or even slippers, providing they are not shared slippers) in public is vital to protect from things like athletes foot and hookworm.

Matthew Celestis said...

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

Hookworm is not much of a problem in societies with modern sanitation and Athlete's foot is does not transmit that easily, except in very damp environments.