Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Integrative Mom: Mahalo For Removing Your Shoes

Integrative Mom: Mahalo For Removing Your Shoes


'So this morning when he asked me “why do we take our shoes off when we go inside our house, but other people don’t take theirs off when they go inside their houses?” instead of giving him all of the reasons we do, I responded with, I guess because we’re part-Hawaiian.

To which he quickly replied, “but I’m not part-Hawaiian, I’m part New York!”

Yes, yes you are. Even more reason to leave your shoes at the door.

The truth is, we never wore shoes in our house growing up because my Hawaiian-Chinese mother never wore shoes in her house growing up. So it is simply a habit I’ve done all my life. Now, in retrospect, I am so thankful it is one that has stuck for many reasons.

I didn’t want to go into excruciating detail with my son about everything that he could possibly track inside our home if he wore his shoes inside, but I will do it here.'

Clarity Zone Magazine: Please Remove Your Shoes

Clarity Zone Magazine: Please Remove Your Shoes


'Now if you don’t give a hoot about pollutants, let me make an appeal to you on behalf of your floors, which can be permanently damaged by your precious Louboutins. Shoes can not only mark your delicate floors but also bring in dirt and small rocks which can easily gouge them. And on brand new wood floors, this is just sacrilegious!

Along with the potential damage come dirty floors. Or even worse, just imagine your plush white carpet speckled with stains of the nasty kind. Ewww! By simply removing your shoes, you can keep your floors and carpets looking clean longer…and use your Swiffer stash a lot less!

In case the expression cleanliness is next to godliness has no place in your lexicon, then just imagine living below someone who wears her, or his if you live in the City of Angels, heels on a wood floor. Doesn’t it make you cringe when you’re trying to catch some extra Zs in the morning, but the loud high heel clicks just won’t oblige? I think we can all agree that no one wants to be on the receiving end of a high heel’s wrath, so kindly leave the click clackers at the door'

Malaysian Meanders: Please Remove Your Shoes

Malaysian Meanders: Please Remove Your Shoes

"Ummm... Do you mind taking off your shoes?"

'Growing up in Houston, Texas, those words always seemed strange and awkward coming out of my mouth. My parents' house is strictly No Shoes Allowed, and as a child, this always seemed to set us apart. Sure, my aunts and uncles had the same rule. My parents' Filipino friends did, too. Grown-up parties with my folks were always marked by a huge pile of shoes at the door. But none of my friends ever made this request. I only realized this custom extended way beyond my family's circle of influence when I first entered the home of my Taiwanese friend in high school. She was surprised that I didn't automatically remove my shoes. "You're Chinese," she said, "you should know to take them off."

After I was married and had my own home, I instigated the No Shoes rule, too. When we visited Hawaii, I considered buying a plaque that said, "Please remove your shoes. It's the Hawaiian way." Except that a) I'm not Hawaiian; and b) I don't live in Hawaii. So, I couldn't figure out how I would justify that reasoning.

By the time I became a mother, non-Asians seemed to be jumping on the No Shoes bandwagon. Baby playgroup discussions covered concerns with thimerosal in vaccinations and phthalates in plastics. Leaving our shoes at the door was a way to keep environmental toxins out of the home. And of course, it's de rigueur for the kiddos to go shoeless at almost any indoor playscape.'