Friday, March 20, 2015

Bed and Breakfasts in the UK

It does seem to have become very common for B & B's in the UK to ask guests to remove their shoes at the door. It is encouraging that they feel able to ask this of paying customers. It makes sense to do this as they are taking in visitors into their homes on a regular basis. They don't want their carpets or flooring ruined.

It seems to be most common for bed and breakfast places in the Scottish highlands to ask for shoes off. That is unsurprising, as their guests are going to be doing a lot of walking. However, there seem to be a fair view bed and breakfasts on the south coast and other parts of England with a no-shoes policy.

It sometimes gets negative reviews on TripAdvisor and other review sites. I suppose it is part of the different experience of the British 'Staycation.' People may be used to holidaying abroad and staying in hotels where they can keep their shoes on. Staying in somebody's house and having to shed the shoes may seem a bit strange for a lot of holidaymakers.

10 comments:

Greenstone said...

This seems to be very odd. Why would the guests want to remove their shoes at the strangers' home? Very inhospitable too.

Do the owners of those B&Bs at least offer slippers to their guests or ask them to bring their own slippers?

Matthew Celestis said...

Not everybody finds removing their shoes in a clean home abhorrent.

Some of them provide slippers, others let guests know in advance so they can bring their own.

Greenstone said...

It seems to me that the owners of those B&Bs are either too cheap to hire cleaning people or too lazy to clean their own floors.

Matthew Celestis said...

You seem to b struggling to understand the difference between dirt, which can be removed through cleaning and permanent deterioration, which over time leads to the need for carpets to be replaced.

People don't replace their carpets just because they want a change of colour.

Greenstone said...

High-quality carpets don't get destroyed solely because of shoes. They are meant for being walked on with shoes on.

Elain Smith said...

I have never been to a B&B myself but as I have stated before I prefer to go in my stocking feet as I excpect my guest to, they are attractive and do save the floors I know when I used to do moving surveys I would wear heavy tights as they were more durable than pantyhose and I knew I would be required to work in my stocking feet

Mark said...

I live in a part of the UK where many go walking and the nature ofthe countryside means that hikers are usually covered in mud.I live near a very upmarket hotel and walkers automatically remove their boots.It is a basic question of respect.it is considered rude here not to remove boots in a hotel and shoes when visiting houses.

Greenstone said...

Mark - this is interesting - do they supply slippers in the hotels (like they do in Japan)?

Anonymous said...

I was staying in a hotel in Brecon Beacons on business last week.

It was quite high up and overnight there had been a dusting on snow (even though it's March!!).

Anyway when I checked out I noticed the receptionist was in a smart trouser suit and socks. While chatting she explained that she had had a lift in but had walked from the main entrance to the hotel over the dusting of snow. She said she had taken her boots off to avoid dirtying the carpets.

Greenstone said...

This was probably nice of the receptionist to take her boots off to avoid dirtying the carpets - wasn't she expected by her employer to wear shoes when she is working, though?